Lacrosse across the globe ‘ the Indigenous American sport that only became popular once a girls’ school in Fife started playing it


The sport of lacrosse is popular across the world, but it only became popular in Europe due to a headmistress at a girls’ school in Fife.

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Celebrity Antiques Road Trip met with lacrosse historian Jane Claydon, who talked about how the original version of the sport bore little resemblance to the one played today.

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Lacrosse has its origins among the indigenous peoples of North America.Games were played as far back as the 12th Century and were huge events, designed to toughen young warriors for war.’There were possibly a thousand people on a team,’ Clayton explained. ‘[The games] covered a huge area.’The sport was named lacrosse in 1637 and became popular with non-indigenous Canadians in the mid-1800s. In 1876, dentist Dr William George Beers changed the rules, reducing the number of players to twelve, and organised competitive matches across America.But it was the headmistress of St Leonards Girls’ School in St Andrews who first brought the game to the attention of British people.Dame Louisa Lumsden was attending a science conference in Montreal and was invited to watch a game of lacrosse.

While you’re here, how about this:

New Hampshire upends Vermont in boys’ Twin State All-Star lacrosse game

Gerry Donahue (7) of Hopkinton gets between a Vermont player and the net during the Twin State All-Star boys’ lacrosse game at Hanover High School in Hanover, June 23, 2018. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff) Elizabeth Frantz’Monitor staff

Cameron Tillman (right) of Merrimack Valley goes after a loose ball during the Twin State All-Star boys’ lacrosse game at Hanover High School in Hanover, June 23, 2018. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff) Elizabeth Frantz’Monitor staff

Matt Bennetter (right) of John Stark takes control of the ball during the Twin State All-Star boys’ lacrosse game at Hanover High School in Hanover, June 23, 2018. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff) Elizabeth Frantz’Monitor staff

  • Publisher: Concord Monitor
  • Date: 6/24/2018 12:25:22 AM
  • Twitter: @conmonitornews
  • Citation: Web link (Learn more)

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Seven inspiring stories from the North American Indigenous Games’

The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures.

Sereana Kaloucokovale, 14, is a point guard for the Maaqtusiis Thunder, a school in Ahousaht,’B.C.

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Around 5,000 athletes will attend the 2017 North American Indigenous Games in Toronto from July 16 to’23.

Among them will be a group of teenagers, whose journeys are geographically, financially and sometimes emotionally challenging. They will arrive by different routes, over thousands of kilometres, to compete in the largest sporting and cultural gathering of First Nations Peoples on the continent. Rachel Brady reports

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  • Publisher: The Globe and Mail
  • Date: 2017-07-14T14:57:21-0400
  • Twitter: @globeandmail
  • Citation: Web link (Learn more)

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